Have re-uploaded the murder ballad mix I put together for [community profile] kink_bingo in 2011; hopefully all the links work. And I have more murdery songs to share with you! This isn't really a playlist, at this point, there's no order to it, just a mass grave for music.

"She's Not There", Neko Case & Nick Cave

"Highway", the HorrorPops
This really should have been on the original list but I missed it somehow when I was putting it together--I knew there was a HorrorPops song I wanted to use but couldn't remember which one it was, and apparently didn't check this one when I was looking.

"Knoxville Girl", Brett Sparks with the Pine Valley Cosmonauts
"Miss Otis Regrets", Jenny Toomey with the Pine Valley Cosmonauts
"The Snakes Crawl at Night", Janet Bean with the Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Gender-neutral partner violence!
"Gary Gilmore's Eyes", Dean Schlabowske with the Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Amazing song, about the recipient of the donated eyes of an executed murderer and the question of is vs. does (i.e., is murderiness inherent in the tissue of a murderer's body, and can it thereby live on after the murderer's death).
"The Plans We Made", Jon Langford and Sally Timms with the Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Murdercouples! [personal profile] thatyourefuse, I think you might like this one.
^ These are all from the first volume of The Executioner's Last Songs, an anthology of songs about death assembled in support of a campaign to abolish the death penalty in Illinois.

"Salt Salt Sea", The Railsplitters
Breezy, interesting spin on "The House/Ship's Carpenter"/"The Daemon Lover"/"James Harris".

Added 25/02/16
"The Box It Came In", Anna Fermin & The Trigger Gospel
Wanda Jackson cover from an album of same, awesome tribute to an awesome lady.

Added 29/03/16
"Bicker Fable", Kim Barlow
Variation on "Two Sisters"/"The Bonny Swans"/etc. narrative.
"Lucy & Jack", Moonshine Willy
"If he can't have her no one will, you've heard it all before"
"Cat-eye Willie Claims His Lover", Dave Darter and Tracy Grammer

(There are also a few tracks of this ilk in the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women playlist I posted in December, if you missed that.)
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I don't think the itchy thing on my arm is ringworm after all. Maybe a spider bite? I've had some similar mysteriously appearing swollen itchy bite-like spots recently, mostly on the same arm, but this one creeped me out with its size-and-shape twoonie impersonation. Still, I should probably postpone my plan to go to Value Village today in case it is communicable (not that I'm feeling all that up to errand running since the rain moved in, stupid achey everything).



Been clawing my way out of a bad mental health pit and I can't say I've reached the top yet but I am kicking my apprehensive ass into actually doing something about that and the physical pain: met with my doctor to get excuse notes and a prescription change (not sure yet whether that'll help, especially as it interacts poorly with methocarbamol and naproxen), talked to a counsellor at school, made some DIY aromatherapy diffusers, went to the Shiatsu School of Canada acupuncture student clinic for the first and second time in months. Still staring at homework and similar obligations with a paralyzing mixture of "donwanna" and "can't", so that's a bit of a problem.



As tired and sore and sulky and paranoid as I've been, I'm looking forward to Mariposa Folk Festival next weekend hella hard. Lineup-wise I know few acts by more than name, apart from Mary Chapin Carpenter (just the mainstage headliner set, no workshops, but still:
).



Oh--nothing dramatic happened with the shirt yesterday. It definitely got some looks and one person walking past me in the other direction said something that included the word "polyamorous" but I didn't catch the rest of it because my earbuds were in and I'd been briefly trapped on the bus between a window and a weed-reeking guy dancing with big arm gestures in the seat next to me about an hour earlier, so I wasn't in a place to stop and ask for repetition.
theleaveswant: illustration: woman in puffy dress & antique diving helmet holds hoop for sharks (one in clown hat &ruff)to swim through (shark ballet)
( May. 27th, 2015 01:42 pm)
1. Feminist Mad Max memery. Thanks, internet.

1a. If anybody knows of a clean camrip or other viddable source, please tell me? I have Ideas.

2. Happy Birthday Bruce Cockburn! You are great.


3. JUST FREAKING RAIN ALREADY.
My main sources for discovering new music are 1. folk festivals, 2. fandom (mostly vids and mixes/playlists but also other fannish interaction), 3. film & tv soundtracks, and 4. other. Other is usually conversations outside of fandom or being near a radio, but the otherest other happened yesterday when I went to Value Village to drop off three bags of clothes I don't wear and shop for one bag of clothes I will. I found a me-sized black t-shirt with some feathers and the words "The Balconies" on it and deduced, correctly, that this was a band I'd never heard of (also there were actually two of the same shirt in the same size, apparently unworn, so plausibly leftover merch). I decided I'd look them up when I got home and I did and they're great. Remind me some of Die Mannequin (who I know because of Hard Core Logo 2/the Bruce McDonald creative cluster) and Halestorm (who I know because of--I had to wrack my brain to remember this--author notes on an unfortunately apparently deleted Game of Thrones rock band AU that cited a Halestorm song as basis for one played by Brienne and Sansa and Arya and Margaery's band), insofar as all are woman-fronted alternative/hard rock bands with punk and metal influences.


As part of Operation: Be Less Anaemic, I've been looking for more ways to get iron-rich foods into my face. Tahini, in particular, has already yielded two successful experiments: toasted raisin bagel with tahini and honey (delicious but sooooo messy) and vegan macaroni thing (cooked macaroni, miso paste, tahini, mustard powder, some non-dairy milk if it's not cheese-saucey enough, splash of lemon juice, nutritional yeast, lentils; green peas optional).
Why I Don't Like Remembrance Day )

Not an especially subtle or nuanced playlist but neither is all that Canada Remembers propaganda.

row on row )
I've been meaning to share some of this summer's musical pleasures since August, and I actually had a post half written and all linked around the end of September-beginning of October but then my computer died and I had to replace it, and school, and October was a really bad month for my mental health, and here we are. Enjoy this sample platter of songs mostly by artists I had not heard before this summer.

onward to the downloads of questionable legality )

PS Do any of you knitterfolk like working with bamboo needles? I have a Chiaogoo Twist complete interchangeable set that I basically never use because I much prefer metal, and I'd like it to go to a good home. $80 or trade for metal needles?
After one lovely day in Victoria with my mum visiting some of her favourite places and another having breakfast with [personal profile] staranise before wandering downtown by myself--with a not quite as lovely day in between where Dad and I went to see the UTTERLY ENRAGING Monty Python reunion show and I stomped out at intermission then cooled down by taking a long solo walk along the ocean and hanging out with a deer--I caught the ferry back to Vancouver, slept on high school friend's couch (wearing borrowed clothes, with all my own stuff out on the balcony, because friend's roommate's MCS is scary severe), left very early in the morning and nearly missed my Greyhound because Translink confuses me, rode bus through mountains! all day long, and was collected by Aunt in Canmore and whisked back to her place.

While in Victoria I'd talked Aunt into accompanying me to the Calgary Folk Music Festival for a day ("talked into" is maybe the wrong expression; she was on board even before I got to the magic words "Bruce Cockburn"). The festival had already sold out of Saturday day passes, of course, but I managed to scoop a pair for face value on Kijiji, woot.

We didn't hurry into Calgary Saturday morning, took our time waking up and didn't rush the drive, so we didn't get through the gates until a little after noon (also I hadn't yet noticed that my iPod's clock didn't switch to Mountain! Standard Time when we crossed into Alberta, so I spent chunks of the weekend believing that it was an hour earlier than it was supposed to be, depending on which timekeeping device I happened to check, but this would not become a problem until Monday). Wristbanded and be-programmed, we plonked down at the nearest source of interesting noises, which happened to be Jaron Freeman-Fox, who is a much weirder person than his program blurb suggests. We planned to stroll around sampling sounds after that but ended up sticking the first place we landed because that place was in front of (well, off to the side of) Nick Sherman, with his charm and his face and his ink-covered arms and his beautiful husky-soft voice.

Next stop was "Letter to a Young Songwriter", because Aunt wanted to get as much Bruce as possible, and I stayed there for a bit before wandering off to check out some stuff towards the western end of the park, including more Roger Knox & pals (no, I had not had enough of them yet, thank you for asking). What Knox is doing, with the help of Langford and his multifarious musical connections (see below), is introducing the world to the rich and tragically underknown tradition of Aboriginal country music in Australia via an album of songs, some previously recorded and hard to find, others never recorded at all, all by Aborigine writers, performed by himself and a mob of talented and established artists in northern hemisphere alt-country and adjacent genres. The story, in a nutshell, is that classic country & western music snuck into Australia via white American servicemen after WWII and, like rabbits and cane toads, made itself at home. Unlike rabbits and cane toads, this introduction was embraced, especially by Aboriginal people, because it's music evolved for big skies, dust storms, camp fires, cattle drives, and telling sad, sad stories--of which the Aboriginal songwriters had plenty to tell. Knox, "the Koori King of Country", was a big deal in this tiny vibrant scene in the 80s, and AFAIC deserves to be a big deal all over the place.

Aunt and I were supposed to meet up again at "Hard Truths and Summer Breezes" but by the time I got there the set was over and the crowd dispersing, so I tried "The People's Mic" (full of folks I'd heard in Vancouver and praised in talking up the festival) and found Aunt there only once the audience started thinning towards the end of the session. The reason it took so long to reach Stage 3, and to get from there to Stage 2, is that the site layout was TERRIBLE. maps and complaints )

I understand that the organizers are limited by the island's size and permanent features, there are only so many configurations they can actually use, but come on. I cannot be the only person to get bounced from volunteer crew to volunteer crew looking for somebody to complain to. (Also, this isn't the organizers' fault but it really pissed me off: somebody hotboxed one of the portaloos that I tried to use right before I tried to use it and, like, what the fuck?!?!? First of all, I hate you. Second, WHY??? Third, I hope you catch many gruesome parasites, you gross, rude jerk. Yech.)

I'm not entirely certain what happened during the first part of the evening? I know Aunt and I were on our blanket in the wee triangular space we claimed at mainstage for part of The Lone Bellow, and then we must have gone to Stage 4 because I remember eating curry there and moving closer to the stage during the changeover before Waco Brothers, but I don't remember listening to Typhoon? I must have been absorbed in my knitting--oh! It was during this block that I went back to Stage 2 to look for the cable needle I'd lost that afternoon. I found it, and a bonus quarter.

Waco Brothers (here joined by or now including Jean Cook and her violin), ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh so good. I danced my legs off and yelled my lungs out and it was awesome. I am amazed and embarrassed that I didn't know about Jon Langford before this summer--like, I was distantly aware of Waco Brothers but couldn't have told you anything about them, and Langford himself I'd never heard of, and it's amazing because the guy is everywhere. He's in I'm-not-even-sure-how-many active bands (Mekons, who've been going since he helped found them in 1977, Waco Brothers, kids' band Wee Hairy Beasties, The Pine Valley Cosmonauts if you consider them a band rather than an event . . .) and plays solo with and without Skull Orchard, is one of the major moving parts in the engine of the alt-country label, Bloodshot Records, and a hero in the Chicago music scene, hosts a radio program, has both inspired and been involved in multiple theatre projects, collaborates with anybody who'll hold still enough long enough, and on top of all that he's a visual artist with a stack of exhibitions, books, a comic strip, and a line of beer labels to his name. It's terrifying how productive he is, especially when you see him in person: this shortish, balding, white-haired Welsh guy three months older than my mother leaping around on stage with more fierce energy than I have ever had or will have. I'm not entirely sure he's human. As a band Waco Brothers are a forceful reminder that the thing we now call alt-country didn't come out of popular country at all--it mostly came out of punk. The bands that kicked it all off in the 80s--Mekons, The Blasters, The Knitters, Rank & File, and everybody else in this rabbit hole I am happily falling down--did it by mixing classic country sounds into punk spirit and punk politics (which might have something to do with how people like Langford, Sally Timms, Dave Alvin, and Alejandro Escovedo are still doing the amazing stuff they do, and why they seem like such genuinely good people); at the time people even called it cowpunk. I expected them to bring out Roger Knox for a song at some point, like Langford had done during what was supposed to be his solo show in Vancouver, but they didn't; they brought Frank Yamma, who led the crowd through this down-in-it call-and-answer blues number, screaming "hey crazy mama" until our throats were raw. This show just did not let up--there were protest songs and union songs and love songs and hate songs and covers pulled from half a dozen genres, and at the end of the set Langford jumped off the stage and ran around in the audience and it was fucking glorious.

After that came the hotboxed portaloo incident, and rage, and looking for somebody to complain about the layout to, and after that came Bruce Cockburn, and that made everything so much better. It was magic. I don't even know what else to say about it, really. I knew the words to almost every song he played, all the singles and a couple of the obscure ones, and they're really good words. That's his biggest strength, from my perspective: good singer, amazing guitarist, bloody devastating poet. Cockburn's another of these folks who doesn't look like a life-changing music god, too--he can turn on that power presence, you see it in some of the photos and hear it sometimes in his voice and then you (I) get the spine-shivers, but most of the time he's just another white-haired white guy, bespectacled subtype. Even on stage, alone, in a leather duster coat with an emerald green guitar, he seems so mild, until you listen. Aunt suggests that the innocuous is a survival tactic, on a career level if not an actual mortality one, like the opposite of a scarlet kingsnake, to persuade TPTB to let him keep performing, which, when you record songs declaring your desire to convert Guatemalan dictators into pulpy splatter . . .

We didn't stay long into Seun Kuti's set, had to get going before things got too sleepy for safe driving on mountain! roads, but yeah. That was my day at the Calgary Folk Festival: excellent musical programming, excellent company (which the festival cannot take credit for), abysmal site layout, and another imaginary stamp on my folk festival passport.
So, Vancouver Folk Music Festival.

Dad (who had the physical tickets) got lost trying to find the site Friday afternoon, so we missed the (apparently traditional) Musqueam opening and greetings, which this year were expanded to include a performance by a group of First Nations women including Ferron welcoming the festival community to the place that used to be Ee'yullmough, now Jericho Beach Park. Missed a chunk of the first mainstage act (Mokoomba) too, but got to see (total cutiepies!) Geomungo Factory perform "Freebird" on traditional Korean instruments at one of the evening side stages, so that was pretty cool. Other than that, Friday wasn't too eventful (the festival, anyway; earlier in the day I'd gone walking up West 4th with the intention of wandering the Endowment Lands all afternoon but found somebody's UBC staff ID on the sidewalk so kept going most of the way to the university to return it--ended up giving it to someone in the Endowment Lands office who said she'd call the university lost'n'found and get it back to the owner, before taking EL trails down to the beach to get back to the hostel).

Saturday was an excellent day for social conscience music, from drizzly morning Leonard Sumner solo concert, to "Rabble Rousers" workshop (Grievous Angels, Frank Yamma, David Rovics--who did this fantastic song "I'm a Better Anarchist Than You"--and ex-Saw Doctors Leo Moran and Anthony Thistlethwaite), to Pete Seeger tribute workshop (fun fact: it's VFMF tradition that a bunch of BC unions sponsor a Saturday afternoon workshop on the Utah Phillips Memorial Stage--aka Stage 2--and this was 2014's; huge audience for this one, both for theme and for the fact Joan Baez was supposed to be there--she had to cancel for medical reasons, alas, but we still got Eliza Gilkyson, Alejandro Escovedo, ought-to-be-legendary Josh White Jr, and Scottish singer-songwriter Karine Polwart, who I'll return to in a bit), to "CountryFolk" workshop (Sumner, Amanda Anne Platt of The Honeycutters, Suzie Vinnick, who told an adorable story about her dad turning a sweet cowboy ballad into a rousing shoutalong--"leather!", and Roger Knox with Jon Langford and Jean Cook, who I'll also return to; I got there just in time to hear Langford explain his and Knox's country-folk credentials: "Roger's from New South Wales, I'm from old south Wales, we're both from the south, we play country music"), to "Power in Song" (Polwart, Rovics, Yamma, and Ashleigh Flynn, though I'm obliged to admit that I napped through most of this one), to Knox-with-Langford-and-Cook solo, and right on into mainstage.

Baez's cancellation meant they had to do some shuffling: Noura Mint Seymali got moved to closer, Escovedo and the Sensitive Boys stayed where scheduled, and Karine Polwart got to take the sunset slot. She ended up one of the first artists at the festival to run out of stock at the merch tent, and frankly I'm not surprised: she's a beautiful, wistful voice and a captivating storyteller. One story she told a few times over the weekend to introduce her song "King of Birds" starts with a dedication to the Occupy movement, who had their London basecamp at St. Paul's Cathedral. the story of the king of birds, paraphrased from Polwart's stage banter )

Saturday's also the day I won the argument with my dad that started the night before when he expected me to agree with him that Leonard Sumner's mainstage tweener (which I didn't hear because I was off exploring the site or something) was terrible and that he had no talent, with the specific accusation that Sumner was "all message, no music". I did not agree, and asserted that Dad not liking rap or First Nations music had no bearing on the talent of people who make that. He backed down, grumblingly, and turned to his program, telling me where he planned to be at what time the next day and how much he was looking forward to Grievous Angels. Early Saturday evening we small-talked where we'd been all day; I'd gone to Sumner's concert and we'd both been at "Rabble Rousers", and I was able to press him on the false non-equivalency he'd constructed between Sumner and the Angels regarding their respective message:music ratios until he admitted that the issue was in his subjective taste rather than their objective talent (nothing against the Angels, I liked them a lot, but you can hardly accuse Charlie Angus of being mellifluous). Dad now claims he was referring to the old lineup, with a female vocalist, when he praised the Angels, but he didn't say that and he bought a bunch of David Rovics CDs, so.

The first session I really attended on Sunday (flitted around a bit during the first time block, a song here and two there) continued and condensed Saturday's themes in a really interesting way. Titled "The People, United . . .", it drew together a crew of familiar faces--Grievous Angels, Roger Knox with Jon Langford and Jean Cook, Frank Yamma with David Bridie, and Leonard Sumner--plus Iskwew Singers, who I knew slightly from last year's Edmonton Folk Festival. Every person on that stage was either indigenous (Australian Aborigine or Canadian First Nations) or working as an advocate for indigenous people (or an indigenous person): Bridie and Langford were at this festival mostly as supporting players for Yamma and Knox, respectively, and had only one concert block each for their own material (and how weird-cool is it that are two Aboriginal men, from different parts of Australia, performing different styles of music, but each accompanied by a whitefella using his higher music industry profile to draw attention to their work, playing the Canadian folk festival circuit at the same time?), Angels' frontman Charlie Angus took a break from music to help his neighbours organize roadblocks and is now the NDP MP for the enormous northern Ontario riding of Timmins-James Bay). It was . . . kind of intense, actually. Tense excited energy swirling through patches of (rather large) audience, nurtured by the perfect kind of cloudy sky; collisions of well-meaning white Canadian awkwardness around racial Others and activated activist potential surging. There were jokes (Sumner: "I never really get to play with a full band behind me. Thanks, Grievous Angels." Angus: "Yeah, we're gonna have to charge you for that." Sumner: "Great! Then I'll charge you rent for that land you're living on!") and the laughter was enthusiastic and sour--but hey, good things aren't necessarily comfortable.

Not many other standout events on Sunday--met up with a high school friend, finished the cardigan I'd been re-knitting, heard Jon Langford play some of his own stuff--up until the Mary Lambert thing. Read more... )
That sucked and it made me go sit under a tree in a place with no people for an hour.

As an event the fest was pretty relaxed, overall. Chock full of lesbians, as previously mentioned--queer women and folk festivals go together like ginger and lemon anyway but this one was really owned. Silver-haired Birkenstock womyn who pioneered the Left Coast tofu cabin lifestyle, glitter-covered babydykes fused together in sickening teenage love, two-mama partnerships doting on cross-racially adopted babies, matched sets of waistcoated butch people . . . It was kinda nice, actually, apart from the "do I look gay enough?" stress I always get around capital-L-esbians when my head's not shaved. Mostly white people but by less of a margin, I think, than other festivals, which makes sense for Vancouver--though it's also, fortunately, a trend across the board, that the population of "folk" attending these festivals is opening up the same way "folk" music is, albeit laggingly. At least that's my hopeful perception, comparing festivals I've been to recently with those of my childhood, where the only people of colour I can remember seeing were either on stage or behind a concession counter. I could make other observations comparing particular aspects of this festival to particular aspects of others but I think this post is long enough already.

(to be followed by a hopefully shorter thing about my one-day jaunt to the Calgary Folk Music Festival and a playlist of new-to-me, and some rediscovered-by-me, musics)
So, apart from the need-a-roommate problem (which . . . might actually be solved now? I don't want to say anything that sounds certain until it is, but there's a measuring tape involved now and I think that's a good sign), things are mostly pretty sweet here. I mean there's an overwhelming amount of stuff going on this month, but on the whole it's positive stuff, and this is a lot of words about some of it:

I'm going to accounting school! )

a wedding (not mine) and a cheesecake )

a folk festival )

another folk festival and geographically related adventures )
YOU CAN TELL A LOT ABOUT SOMEONE BY THE TYPE OF MUSIC THEY LISTEN TO. HIT SHUFFLE ON YOUR IPOD, PHONE, ITUNES, MEDIA PLAYER ETC. AND WRITE DOWN THE FIRST 20 SONGS. THEN PASS THIS ON TO 10 PEOPLE. ONE RULE: NO SKIPPING.

1. K's Choice -- My Heart
2. The Mountain Goats -- Cotton
3. Metric -- Combat Baby
4. Natalie Merchant -- Saint Judas
5. Bif Naked -- You Are the Master
6. Dar Williams, Lucy Kaplansky, and Richard Shindell -- Down by the Water
7. Nashville cast (Connie Britton) -- Bitter Memory
8. Tracy Chapman -- Across the Lines
9. Nathan -- Scarecrow
10. Shane Koyczan and the Short Story Long -- Apology
11. Shivaree -- John, 2/14
12. Dave Gahan -- Dirty Sticky Floors
13. The Handsome Family -- Drunk by Noon
14. Old Man Luedecke -- Closing Time (Leonard Cohen cover on banjo your argument is invalid)
15. Placebo -- Devil in the Details
16. Hey Rosetta -- Another Pilot (fucking conscience is siding with the wrong siiiide)
17. The Ramones -- I Wanna Be Sedated
18. Kim Barlow -- Waterfall
19. The Tragically Hip -- Twist My Arm
20. Po Girl -- Deer in the Night

Even considering this is only 1.3% of the songs on my iPod rn, I'm surprised there's only one Tracy Chapman and amazed there's no Veda Hille.
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Been thinking of doing an Ageplay mix for [community profile] kink_bingo since last summer; decided when I started actually pulling tracks together to narrow it down to a particular span of temporal-cultural experience and save other spans for later. I recognize that teenage feeling, even though my adolescence bore little resemblance to most of those described in the narratives within--I was neither an athlete nor much of a delinquent, and I had no significant romantic entanglements nor sexual encounters with anyone my own age or older until I was nearly out of the age range. Probably just as well--that's a lot of drama to pack into not very many years, and I have made up for some of it since. I also recognize the historical contingency of the teenage experience, and the cultural, geographic, and economic variation it demonstrates (some of that variation is illustrated here). The feeling still resonates.

Content notes: alcohol and drug use; 'characters' under the age of 18 engaging in sex with same- and cross-generational partners; dubiously consensual sex (coercion and consent under compromised conditions); mentions of self-harm and suicide; bullying, nonconsensual public humiliation and violence, gang and police violence, possible allusions to rape and murder, 'character' death.

That Teenage Feeling )

Download .zip
Here's another long-overdue fanmix for [personal profile] afullmargin, who asked for kind of a happy quirky mix for Sean and Gus from Psych. I don't follow Psych but I've seen enough scattered episodes (and some really lovely vids and fic) that I felt I had a good enough grasp of the tone of the show and of their relationship, so here's a basket of sunshine and WTF that wobbles on the line between shippery and BFFdom. A lot of the lyrical themes seem to me to apply just as well to any other Holmes-and-Watson relationship dynamic, so as far as I'm concerned this is a mix for all of them, though of course they don't all have don't have the same pineapple-bright emotional flavour.



download .zip

nutritional information )
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So I know I've owed a mix to [personal profile] dragovianknight for approximately one million months and I've owed one to [personal profile] garden_hoe21 for nearly half that long, and in light of the overdueness these probably look a little half-assed, but I've actually had to fight myself down from a Sisyphean quest for curatorial completeness just to get these danged things posted so here are some unsorted collections of 1) "music to write fight scenes by" and 2) music to carry someone off to sleep, posted together because I like the pseudo-symmetry. I might try to make up for the sloppiness with more mixes, later.


fight songs! )
download


lullabies )
download
eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee I am so excited! And because I am excited, here are sixteen more songs, in no particular order, that give me Avengers character ~feeeeeeeeeeeelings~ (aww, who am I kidding, they're feels, for the Avengers I have feels and I feel them in my feelers):

"Mercy of the Fallen", Dar Williams
"Little Waltz", Basia Bulat
"Guns Not Bombs", Die Mannequin
"Frank Mills", Veda Hille (Hair cover)
"The Future", Weekend Dads*
"Price Paid", Wax Mannequin
"Chelsea Hotel No. 2", woodpigeon*
"Microphone", The Fugitives
"First We Take Manhatten", Les Jupes*
"Snowman", The Nields
"Five Free Minutes", Spirit of the West
"Angel, Won't You Come Down?", Tracy Bonham
"Ex-Army", Boys Boys Boys!
"Rhapsody", Veda Hille
"In Your Light", Bruce Peninsula
"A Thousand Suns", Hey Rosetta
* from this amazing FREE collection of Leonard Cohen covers by a passel of Canadian artists

Download ici
I look forward to discovering how narratively or affectively predictive my choices are or are not :)

And on that note I am out, off for a busy evening of babysitting, Cards Against Humanity, and MIDNIGHT SCREENING OMFG ALL THEIR PERFECT FACES IN SHINY SHINY 3D *dies and is dead*

ETA: Stopping by between kids and games to throw up gang signs and blood one more song for the cast and production crew and for the fandom: "Doin'" by Wax Mannequin.
So you know how it takes me months and months and months to make fanmixes for people who commission them from me in fundraising auctions because, well, mostly because I don't work on them very often, but also because I am an obnoxious completist about them? (People to whom I owe music mixes: I promise that I will get them done ASAP after I get back from Boston. Really. I will stop adding more things to the "shortlists" and chop them down into postable shapes with haste). I threw this together in an afternoon, in between cleaning and picking at my conference paper (and am now resisting the perfectionist urge to tweak and tweak and tweak). Pah.

Earth's Mightiest Dorkfaces: A Musical Tribute to Marvel's Odd-sock Drawer Superhero Team, and My Feelings Regarding Those Socks )

just the tracks, ma'am )

download .zip
In conclusion,
1. The breakingest news: As I learned via [personal profile] petra yesterday, Lucy Liu has been cast as Watson in the upcoming American remix of the BBC's contemporary remix of the already-been-remixed-umpteen-billion-times Sherlock Holmes franchise, and some fans are saying that's not acceptable. They're right, it's not acceptable--it's AWESOME. The folks with bees up their butts are trying to argue that making Watson female is somehow homophobic? And they have fragments of a point with the complaint that an opposite-gendered Holmes-Watson pair stand a greater chance of consummating any sexual tension on screen (if this version chooses to go that route, and I really really really hope it doesn't) than their preferred same-gendered pairs and that this is not fair (it's not), but people who whine that this is depriving them of gay television characters or, worse, "artificially" interfering with an otherwise perfect formula for "political purposes" are some unpleasant mix of oblivious and deluded and should recite the chorus to "As Cool as I Am" (thanks [personal profile] kore for posting this lovely recording) as mantra until they recognize that supporting the omission, sidelining, and fridging of female characters in favour of more bromances is active complicity in patriarchal oppression via popular culture.

2. Apparently there exists a movie called After Sex, which is like Young People Fucking in that it features a set of non-overlapping stories about sexual encounters, but different in that it a) has a larger cast (eight sets of participants instead of five), b) has a more diverse cast (including three same-sex participant sets, one set of older participants and one set of teenagers, and many more characters of colour), and c) tells the stories one after the other, like a slate of discrete short films each of which begins shortly following a sexual interaction, rather than weaving the stories together before, during, and after. I don't find it quite as funny, although it does have its moments, but it fits a similar niche of crudely thoughtful sex comedy. The best sequence, and the one that drew my attention to the film, is the one between Kat (Zoë Saldana) and Nikki (Mila Kunis) as college roommates, and (happy day) their full bit including Kat's amaaaazing monologue about her first time with another girl (bizarrely not included in the regular release of the film!) is available for watching right here:


3. I wrote a little Death Proof/The Losers crossover as a treat for the Ante Up Scramble and discovered in the process that it was the germ of a much bigger story that I did not have time to write then but still really want to. I signed up for [livejournal.com profile] crossbigbang as an incentive to finish it (although I might drop out of that and take the idea to the rumoured upcoming Losers Big Bang instead), but I'm blocked from getting started because I'm stumped on setting. Basically, I need a place (city/region) that provides a reason-for-being-there for both the gang from Death Proof (Kim, Zoë, Abernathy, and Lee--so, filming something) and the Losers (including Aisha and Roque, in this story neither dead nor treacherous, and their famblies--so, heistifying something), but I can't decide on where and what because I'm waffling on whether to set it more in the "real world", where Zoë Bell is Zoë Bell-muse-of-Quentin Tarantino, Clay smokes [some actual cigarette brand], and it becomes somehow relevant to the plot that Jensen resembles Chris Evans, or, as I'm leaning towards, in a sort of meta-fictional world that draws fake pop culture from various sources, where QT is perhaps manifested as Chester Rush, Clay smokes Red Apples, and it becomes somehow relevant to the plot that Jensen resembles Lucas Lee. The latter is inherently more hilarious and potentially a lot more fun and easter-eggy, but it's also more work for me because I have to decide not only how to weave together different fictional Hollywoods, etc., but also what "real world" pop culture icons to retain or fictionalize/satirize (for example, Pam Grier as Foxy Brown--keep or rename?). Either way I'm stuck deciding how closely I want Lee's career to mirror Mary Elizabeth Winstead's. I dunno. Any suggestions for filmable stories that require stunt women and driving that would help me narrow down shooting locations, as a starting place?
YOU GUYS GUESS WHAT! Somebody ([personal profile] jessalae) made me a preeeesent! Well, I suppose it's not technically a present because I commissioned it in a fandom fundraiser (I'm a patron of the arts!), but IT IS AWESOME NONETHELESS. It's called Multiverse Criminology and it is a Community/Fringe crossover in which Evil!Abed and Troy create a Fringe event crossing into the Redverse, and are promptly rounded up by Altlivia & crew (including Altstrid, wonderful Altstrid), and it is pretty much perfect. The first sentence made me laugh out loud and it rolls along from there.

With that important bit of squee out of the way, I shall move on to the double crux (crotch?) of this post, to whit: falling into Avengers Movieverse fandom and my big shiny crush on Jeremy Renner, with many helpful videos and links, mostly about The Unusuals I LOVE THE UNUSUALS )

I think it's time for more icons. There, icon'd.
Damnit are there no reasonably well-known horror movies of the 1980s left that have not yet been remade or sequelified? I feel like The Thing was the last one and that remake was seriously underwhelming (digital Thing, not nearly so squicky--maybe it's scary in 3D?), even with Mary Elizabeth Winstead going all Ripley.

[community profile] ante_up_losers is live! There are about 40 new stories in the exchange and scramble (treat) collections. I ended up finishing my assignment (somehow one of the longest stories I've ever posted, no really how did that happen? and probably never going to be as popular as the one I wrote last year) and four treats for different recipients (all below 1000 words each, mostly nearer the lower end of the rating scale, exhibiting a range of moods and 'ships but mostly talky gen fluff, one crossover that I am maybe not-so-casually considering expanding, to the point of checking [community profile] fandomcalendar for Big Bang events that I could count it towards); you can try to identify them, if you want, before the reveal on Tuesday.

Anyway, continuing from last post, trying vainly to show some fucking restraint damnit, more opinions about media!

Feature Films B: Captain America vs. X-Men First Class, and also Muppets )

Music )

Television Series: Ongoing )

Television Series: Premiering pt 1: Arctic Air )

Television Series: Premiering pt 2: Bomb Girls )

Television Series: Premiering pt 3: House of Lies )

Stay tuned for Festivids recs, if you, y'know, care.
This was supposed to be my More Joy Day post and then my Day After More Joy Day + Snowflake Day 13 post but then I had a fever and the [community profile] ante_up_losers draft deadline jumped around and also Life Is Hard, so I'm only getting to it now. Anyway, here are some of my Opinions about various media objects, some fresh, some stored up, mostly positive, sometimes with caveats and lots of parentheses.

Books )

Documentary )

Feature Films A: Five Excellent Canadian Films That Not Enough People Talk About, Especially in C6D Fandom )

. . . and I'm actually gonna break it there for now (and probably never finish it, knowing me), because this entry is once again much too long, and I have to let it go and move on to Day 14 (ask for help): I need a beta or team thereof! Most urgently for a fic for the Losers exchange that does live on Friday (augh how did this get so long it was supposed to be simple porn and also the ending feels really awkward), and also for some other projects (mostly [community profile] kink_bingo fic and vids at various stages of completion).

At least I'm feeling pretty good about my C6DVD exchange project.
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